Authentic Leadership & Vulnerability with JM Ryerson

Hey, hey, hey, Campers! Today’s guest is the one and only JM Ryerson from Let’s Go Win. This guy has not one, but TWO successful company exits under his belt. And you know what he learned? That leadership is the key to crushing it in both your personal and professional life.JM coaches high-performing leaders to find their own unique leadership style and execute it like a boss. Plus, he’s a keynote speaker who uses “accelerated learning techniques” (fancy, right?). His Show Up As You system will help you bring out the best in yourself as a leader and inspire your team to achieve next-level success.We had a blast chatting with him, and we KNOW you’re gonna love it too. Tune in and find out for yourself!

Highlites with time stamps:

[00:00:00] Start
[00:03:16] “Be You: The Transformative Power of Authenticity”
[00:05:52] “Embrace Your Strengths: The Power of Collaboration”
[00:08:20] “Podcasting: Deep Dive Conversations You’ll Love”
[00:10:43] “Unconventional Coaching: Inspiring Human Beings to Thrive”
[00:13:08] “From Passion Project to Networking Tool: Let’s Go Win”
[00:14:21] “Podcasting Connects People Worldwide, Sparks Collaborations”
[00:17:05] “Philosophy: Getting Better Every Single Day”
[00:19:10] “Life is About Growing or Decaying”
[00:21:19] “Fascinating Dentist and Heartfelt Tribute: Podcast Highlights”
[00:24:49] “The Power of Vulnerability in Leadership”

  • The importance of authenticity in personal and business success
  • Being true to oneself and identifying areas of weakness
  • Using one’s own marker for success rather than limiting perspectives of others
  • The three common qualities among successful people: leaders are readers, they meditate, and they have a positive mental attitude
  • The importance of a positive mental attitude
  • The value of podcasts and reading in personal development
  • The speaker’s love for books and podcasts
  • Learning from successful people’s struggles and vulnerabilities
  • Taking notes during podcasts for coaching or personal use
  • The Let’s Go Win podcast and speaker’s coaching business
  • The podcast as a tool for building relationships and connections
  • Let’s Go Win’s approach based on universal philosophies and principles
  • Balancing mind, body, and soul for work-life balance
  • Personal success stories with Kevin, a professional golfer, and clients who lost weight and improved their business
  • The power of podcasting as a personal and business development tool
  • The speaker’s love for podcasting and personal transformations
  • The free and accessible nature of podcasts
  • The need for education and training in podcasting
  • The goal of reaching 100 million episodes and releasing twice a week.

Books Mentioned:

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership : 25th Anniversary: Follow Them and People Will Follow You https://amzn.to/42fVzo9

JM’s Links:

Website: https://letsgowin.com/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jm-ryerson
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/letsgowin365
Twitter: https://twitter.com/letsgowin365
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/letsgowin365

Book a call with Molly: https://calendly.com/mollyruland/discovery

Molly Ruland: CEO & Founder ‌

Matt Billman: Operations Manager

Sponsored by : Heartcast Media
http://www.heartcastmedia.com

Transcript

Molly:

 

All right, we’re coming in hot today on another episode of Camp Content. We are welcoming, welcoming J. M. Ryerson on the show today. He is the founder of let’s go, Win. He has successfully founded or built and exited two companies, and he has learned how leadership can impact your life and your business. He personally coaches high performing leaders to define and execute their own leadership style. He’s a keynote speaker who employs accelerated leadership style, excuse me, accelerated learning techniques. Through his show, as You System, his system helps utilize your role as a leader to ignite the ambition and confidence your team needs to hit next level success. So what does all that mean? He teaches you how to be a great leader so that your business can thrive because you can understand business development, you can understand sales, and you can understand people, but if you don’t understand leadership, you’re never really going to get there. So we’re excited to have this conversation today, for sure.

 

Matt:

 

Yeah. And not only is he an excellent leader with a track record, but he also hosts a podcast, let’s Go Win, a peak performance interview show on Leadership Mindset. Business Development speaks with a lot of leaders and entrepreneurs with inspirational stories on personal development, achievement, and success. A personal favorite of mine I went through and listened to a couple was the one about the power of storytelling with Jason Seroni. I believe if I said that last name right, that was kind of a deep dive in, like the tragic story about Kobe Bryant. So if you’re a sports guy, it’s kind of interesting and good stuff. So the Show offers a lot to his listeners, but today we’re kind of happy to have him on to now share his side of the story, his motivation tips and tools to now help our listeners and audience and fans, because we do have fans, I hope become better and more successful in working life. So, yeah, welcome to the show.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Well, you got one fan here. Thanks for having me, Matt. I appreciate it. What an intro. I appreciate it. And, yeah, it’s been a fun ride.

 

Molly:

 

Right on. Yeah, you’ve done a lot. One thing I really liked looking at your website is that on your about page that, well, your wife is involved, heavily involved in the business. I would love to interview her at some point, for sure. But I love that you have pictures of your family on the About US page because that’s really what it is, right? It’s all tied into the leadership thing. It’s at home and in your company. And I just thought that was really impactful to see that.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, it was really interesting. The video I was watching just before coming on, this guy was talking about people having three lives, having their public life, their personal life, and then their secret life. And I was like, I don’t have that. I literally have one life where I’m like, here it is, guys. Whether you like it or you don’t, this is what you get. Because I don’t want to try and manage all those other lives. It’s so easy. Just be like, Here I am. Just like we were talking about you’re. Like, yeah, I’m up in Costa Rica. An amazing spot. This is who I am. And you just let it out there. I love that. I think that’s just so much easier.,

 

Molly:

 

Well, and that’s the core of your show up as your system. You want to talk about that a little bit?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, it’s really a basic idea, and my wife hates when I say that, but it truly is. The idea is just being you. So the best example I can give is I’m six five, okay? That’s how God made me. I didn’t choose that. It’s just what I am. It’s really easy to be six five. It takes no time, no energy, and my back’s in alignment at six five. I could try to be five five, but then that’s a lot of time, a lot of energy, and my back is totally out of alignment. Why do that? Why spend all this time being something that you’re not? But so often we do because people put on these masks at some point and we start to try and fit in. We compromise who we are. And the whole idea of show up as you is just that beautiful soul that you are inside of you. Just be that because there’s only one of you. You have some amazing gifts and talents that the world needs to see. Let’s share them. Don’t hide behind some mask or some facade of what you think the world wants to see. Just be you. And what people will find is that their personal life in terms of their relationships are way more fulfilling. Their business takes off and they have real work life balance because they’re not trying to manage all of these expectations, they’re just being them. And so that’s why I say it’s basic. It’s like, let’s get back to stripping down to who we are at the core and be totally okay with it. And it’s amazing when you see the transformation people make when they get super comfortable doing that.

 

Molly:

 

Well, yeah, if you think about how they got their business in that place in the first place is because of who they are. And they attracted good talent, and people decided to believe in them for whatever reason. And so then as you grow and you see more success, you shouldn’t try to alter that person into what you think or what you see. Right. Because it’s not always the right thing. It’s kind of a random example, but like the yeti microphone, everybody buys the yeti microphone because everybody saw people on YouTube using it. But it’s literally the worst microphone for podcasting in your office. It just is. It’s a great microphone, but not for that purpose. That’s why you don’t see them at podcast conventions, but because people see it, they think that’s the standard, and that’s what I’m going to do. And I think we see that a lot of times in leadership and with success, where it’s like, well, this is the marker. And not to mention a lot of times that marker is like a white male with a whole lot of privilege. And that doesn’t always shake out to everybody else at the table either. So I think showing up as your authentic self is really, really important. I mean, that’s how you got the idea for the company. That’s how you got here. But you might not be good at certain things, so I think identifying those is really helpful.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, there’s no doubt when you’re clear on who you are, what your strengths are, what your weaknesses are, maybe even more important, and you’re totally okay with that. Here’s what’s cool. So I’m guessing Matt and Molly came together because one has certain strengths in one area and one has strengths in the other. And when you put them together, they’re really a powerful combination. But on our own, if we’re trying to be everything, we end up being very little. The jack of all trades, master of none. Instead, when you really are comfortable, like, I’m great at leadership. I am. It’s something I love, I’m passionate about it. I make things simple. And so those are two of my superpowers, quote unquote, is keeping things simple and leadership. I suck at back end the producing of this show. Like, I think you said, Matt’s, like an expert. I’m like, Dude, I know nothing about that, literally nothing. And I’m totally okay with that. At certain times early in life, I would have wanted to really fix that weakness and try to be it all to everyone. But here’s the challenge. Now you’re taking away an opportunity from someone that can really excel. And it’s just so easy when you’re like, look, I’m good at this, I suck at that, and I’m totally good with it.

 

Molly:

 

You just hit on a major point. The thing that I love about reading books about leadership is it laser focuses the things I’m not getting right, like where my Achilles heels are and where my weaknesses are, which identifying those makes me better at my job, because then I can pass them to somebody else, like you said, and not taking an opportunity. It’s interesting. In the podcast space, there’s so much of that you’re supposed to understand how to use your microphone and edit it and know lighting and know what to say and know who to interview and know how to release it and know how to mark it. It’s like you’re going to play the violin at the company reception later, too, maybe do your taxes and oil change. Is there anything you don’t want to do? And I think it’s unfortunate because a lot of podcasts don’t make it because there’s this expectation that they’re supposed to know all these things when meanwhile, people go to school for audio engineering. To think you’re just going to pick that up real quick, it’s almost belittling to the people who went to school for it, and it’s just unrealistic, right? Because you’re spending time on the wrong thing. So, speaking of podcast, let’s go win  million episodes. I love it. Twice a week? Are you really going twice a week? That’s impressive.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

I love it. I didn’t expect to love this forum. I told my wife not long ago, I said, Babe, at some point, the only thing I will do is the podcast. She goes, what are you talking about? I was like, look, the keynote speaking, the coaching, it’s cool. And I like it. I love podcasting. And I didn’t know that until I started doing it. And I found this idea to be fascinating because I had my best friend of over  years on the show, and I know everything there is to know about this gentleman, or so I thought. And then we got into the show, and because I’m asking deeper questions, different questions than even again, I know his kids, I know his likes, his dislikes, his fears. I know this stuff. And yet through the podcast asking him additional questions, I found out these really amazing things about this person I know so well in love. And that’s when it hit me. I was like, this is just the coolest forum, because you dive in deeper. It’s not just surface level questions. It’s really getting to know the other person and them getting comfortable enough to be vulnerable and share. And the other part is it’s essentially free for the listener, right? So you can get all this amazing stuff without having to go pay $, to go to a retreat or $, for this. You literally have this stuff available to you. I’m obsessed with the idea. So anyway, yes, let’s go in. Podcast is one of my favorite things I get to do every single week, and I do it twice a week. It’s awesome.

 

Molly:

 

How long ago did you start the podcast? Oh, sorry, Matt.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Well, I feel like we should let Matt talk.

 

Matt:

 

No, I just had a kind of going back to two things Molly said earlier. A, I mean, I feel like we find a way to take a dig at the Yeti every episode, so that’s good. And B, she kind of talked about different people and altering them and everything. So I was kind of looking at some of your testimonials on your site, and I was curious about your approach, and I was looking at kind of two specifically because it’s just such a wide array of people. So you have two right here, back to back. One is Jen Lil Brown. That’s a ghostwriter for Influencers. And then right after that, you have Kevin Lucas, who’s a pro golfer so obviously two completely different worlds. Like, how are you approaching that? Is it kind of the same approach? And then just what were the kind of differences and stuff you saw working with those two people?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, it’s a great question. And amazing human beings, by the way, if anybody’s looking for a ghost writer, I cannot give a big enough shout out to how amazing she is. She’s brilliant in terms of what I do. The philosophies, the principles, they apply to everyone. So, yes, Kevin is a professional golfer, and, yes, I have coached him on certain things. And here’s what’s amazing. It’s the same as helping this other kid lose  pounds. It’s the same as helping the executive with his business and accelerating that. It’s all the same idea. And so marketing firms are like, you’re an idiot because you’re not Niching. You’re not niching. And I’m like, well, maybe I am an idiot, and I’m okay with that. Because the intent of let’s Go Win, the purpose and why it exists is to inspire people to live their best lives. Well. That doesn’t have a niche. That doesn’t mean that I only work with people in the insurance industry, which I have, or people in the healthcare industry, which I have. They’re people. We are human beings. We are not human doings. And I know that we get that mixed up all the time. People think I’m doing this. No, you’re not. Yes, that’s something that you’ve chosen to do, and that’s cool. But at the core, you are a being. And we need to look at this. We need to take a peek inside to say, how am I taking care of myself? Am I taking care of my mind, my body, and my soul? So the idea of working, the two examples you gave, they’re both amazing human beings. They both have amazing talents and gifts in their area, and they both wanted to have great work life balance. And that was something that I was able to shed some light on. So I’m so glad you brought them up because I get really just amazing flow of memories and thinking about those two human beings and how some of the stuff that we work on was able to impact them in a positive way. Does that answer me?

 

Matt:

 

Yeah, that’s it right there. Like I said, I was looking at and there’s just such an array of different backgrounds and people in business and everything. I’m like pokerkoffer. Ghost Rider. It’s a little different here.

 

Molly:

 

It’s different, for sure. So how has the podcast impacted your business? Did you start it as just a passion project? Did you start it to help promote the business? What was the intention?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, I started as a passion project. Actually, I had two when I first started. Let’s go. Win was called transcend in life at some point. And then somebody was like, Why do you call it that? I was like, Because I love the word transcend. And they’re like, we don’t no one understands what the hell you’re talking about. Okay, got it. So we went to let’s Go Win, and it’s been so much easier because everybody, when you look up, let’s go win, you get to see what we’re working on. And then the other one was for a financial service company, one of the companies I was running. And so to answer your question, I start as a passion project because I love to share information. I read books for a year. It’s just something I’m passionate about. I love books, and I realize that most people don’t love to read books. Cool. So why don’t we take some of this information that is stored up in my head and let’s share it so that other people that may not want to read that much can use it, apply it with their life. And so it did start as a passion project. And then I realized, oh, my God, this is the greatest networking tool of all time. And my great example here is I’m talking to you again. You’re in Costa Rica. And I’m sorry, Matt, I don’t know where you’re at right now.

 

Matt:

 

Right outside of DC.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Right outside of DC. So we have several hundred and thousand miles away from one another, and yet we’re able to connect person to person. Yes, we have screen, but I can do it with somebody in New Zealand, South Africa. And so my network went from being just in this little area of let’s just call it the US. To now it’s all over the world, and we get to dive in and really get to bond and relationships are built. And then it happens that a lot of business takes place after that. So the amount of collaborations that have taken place because of the podcast, I did not expect that. But it’s why I’m so obsessed with continuing to do it, because I get better every single day. And my intent is to help the audience. I want them to hear it. But the truth is, it’s really become a selfish endeavor. I’m learning so many amazing things from so many amazing people, and I get to share that, and I get to now have them part of my world. You can’t get me to stop doing that.

 

Molly:

 

Yeah, I couldn’t agree more, Jam. Honestly, going from DC to Costa Rica was quite the jump. And I mean, it was definitely fueled by the pandemic. So we went from living in a bustling city to a ghost town like Weird Zombie Apocalypse, and then moving to Costa Rica. So it’s been very isolating. And so I have found that from doing the podcast and interviewing people and doing the pre interview calls, it’s been so enjoyable. Right? And so it’s not just like we teach branded podcasting as a business development tool, like, really go into it, looking at it that way. But it’s a connection tool. It’s a people tool. And it’s so nice because it is. Everything in life is about relationships, right? It’s always about, maybe I’m going to hang out with you when you come to Costa Rica. You never know. You just never know what will come of it and most likely some business or at least a relationship. And I think the real quality of life is in relationships. It could be with somebody you randomly meet at the airport bar, taking a flight out you never see again. But it’s always in these moments of sharing wisdom or any sort of connection with each other. And a podcast is such a great tool for that. So I think you really nailed it with the good for business but also just really personally rewarding. That’s great. That’s really great. So when did you start the podcast?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

So this started right as the pandemic started. I wanted to say the first one was April. So my show has been gosh, three years now. I guess it’s been going.

 

Molly:

 

That’s pretty amazing. That’s pretty amazing. Have you found that you are using some of your podcast content with your coaching content or vice versa? Is that kind of like a lateral scale there?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, all the time. So the basic idea that I have, my philosophy is to get better every single day, right? Some people want to get % better. Some people want to have a growth mindset. Whatever you choose, I don’t really care. Kaizen is another idea. Japanese philosophy, it’s great. My basic philosophy is I just want to get better every single day. After today, a couple of things will happen. After we’re done with this episode, my energy level is going to rise. It does every single podcast. And it is as we’re doing this. And I’m going to learn something from you guys that I’m % going to tell other people about. Because you guys have brilliance in what you’re doing. And I want people to know about it, what camp content is all about. I want them to understand like, this is what these people can do for you. So I % apply from every podcast. There is a lesson, there’s something to be learned from it. And if you’re not taking notes and I know a lot of times you’re driving and people can’t do it, but I’m always taking notes. And then I do a download and I’m like, oh, cool. I can now use this with a coaching client. I can now use this for how to use podcasts to get more clients. And so to answer your question, yes, I use it all the time. The information share that people are willing to give. Here is free information. Here you go. Go make your life better. That’s what it’s all about. So I use them all the time.

 

Matt:

 

Yeah, I mean, the day you stop trying to learn is, oh, Matt, you’re muted better. Oh, I shouldn’t be.

 

Molly:

 

I swear. We do this all the time.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

That’s all right. It’s live, man.

 

Molly:

 

There you go.

 

Matt:

 

Was it muted?

 

Molly:

 

Yeah, you were muted. Look at that. The riverside gods.

 

Matt:

 

No. I was going to say yes. The day you stop trying to learn is the day you stop getting better. You might be the best and maybe one of the top people in your industry, but every single person in that industry has a different approach in how they do things. If you learn from somebody that may be seen as kind of a lesser than you or something or a blower in the industry, it’s like, well, maybe I can take this approach and apply it to how I do things, maybe tweak it a little bit. And now I got a whole way of looking at it.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, it’s true. And I said earlier, we’re human beings, right? But I do believe human beings are doing two things. They’re either growing or they’re decaying. And there’s no, like, I’m going to sit at this plateau, I’m just going to chill. I don’t think that exists. I truly believe we are either growing or we’re going the other way. And so the moment that you think you’ve arrived and it’s like, I’m good, you’ve lost. You have to want to continue to learn. There’s so much that we don’t know and there’s so much to explore. And that’s what you’re probably again, I know the area that you’re living in, and I love it in Costa Rica, the whole pure Vita idea, and I’ve only been there four times. You’re experiencing it like living there permanently. You’re really getting to the core of who these amazing ticos and tikas are and all that they have to offer. And watching that amazing volcano and you probably get to see the lava flow down and all these experience that people may or may not get to experience, but you decided, I’m going to go out and I’m going to challenge myself. This is different. I don’t have Amazon available to me every single day. I don’t have a supermarket right next to me. These are some compromises that you chose. And your life, I’m sure, has expanded and grown significantly. That’s what life is all about. And that’s what the whole podcast I didn’t know anything about podcasting. I didn’t go to school for that. I just wanted to reach out to people. And so circling back, I use this all the time to grow let’s go win. Because let’s say you have  listeners. ,, ,, it doesn’t matter. Someone is going to hear this and say, you know what? That guy does something that I want a piece of. I want to know what let’s Go Win is all about. Cool, now we’ve connected. That helps grow the let’s Go Win brand, that helps them in a certain way in their life. And that’s the way this whole thing goes. So it’s remarkable. Whoever came up with podcasting, I just want to give them a hug, like, thank you.

 

Molly:

 

Right?

 

Matt:

 

I mean, we couldn’t go to school for podcasting even at my age . It’s like it wasn’t even a thing then. But speaking about, like, taking learning lessons from every episode, is there one episode that you’ve done that sticks out where as soon as you finish recording and got off the call, you’re like, oh, this is the one. This is it right here.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, it’s a really good question. There’s a guy named Dr. Bill Dorfman, and I think the reason I remember Bill’s episode so well is he’s a dentist. Now, how interesting is a dentist when we really think about it? And the truth is, he was fascinating. It was one of the most amazing interviews where I was like, okay, this guy has so much depth to him. And again, it’s a great example of what I coach not to do. I labeled him as a dentist. Well, labels are not meant for human beings. They’re meant for boxes, man. And I put this label on him as like, this is his profession, therefore, he only has X to give. This guy has so much to give. He just happens to help people with their teeth, and he’s like the Michael Jordan of dentistry. Cool. But he has so much more to give. So that’s one that sticks out. I talked about my dad, and I lost him march , . That’s an episode that I shared with the world how he died, and it was very vulnerable, and that’s opened people up to reach out to me to say, I’m struggling with this, too. That’s another one of my favorites, which is weird that it’s not having a guess, but I’ll always cherish that episode as well.

 

Molly:

 

My mom passed away right around the same exact time, and so I did an episode talking about that a little bit, and that was the episode I got the most comments on, too. Or when I see people, they’re like, hey, I really appreciate you talking more about your personal life. So I actually shifted. And I have another podcast that I’m only going to talk about my personal life and moving to Costa Rica and what that really means and leaving behind all those things and understanding privilege and colonization and comfort and inconvenience and all of these things, right. It really challenges every bit of you being here. But the one where I was the most personal is the one that I got the most feedback on from other women, primarily. So, yeah, podcasting is really it’s so cool. And I’ve always been obsessed with pirate radio. I love this idea of having access and broadcasting a message almost illegally without paying anybody. There’s a little bit of civil disobedience, I think, in it, and the fact that you can have these longer conversations where you really get to know somebody a little more than a tweet or an Instagram post. I didn’t even know there was ghost writers for. I mean, I know other people manage social media, but it’s a different level of communication and connection on a podcast that’s just unmatched. And so I agree with you. I think it’s such a cool format. I think it’s so personal and unique and such a phenomenal business development tool. I don’t think people understand that the guest is more important than your audience. When you’re doing a branded podcast, people think about a podcast for their business or think about Colgate doing or an insurance company doing a podcast about insurance. But that’s not what it is at all. It’s really getting to know the person, understanding the business, showing up as yourself. It’s just such a unique opportunity to get more business, forge relationships with the people that you want to do business with and also connect with your audience at the same time and provide like a really good outlet. Because I’m sure you need an outlet too. You coach a lot of people, you do a lot of stuff, but you also need an outlet to let that stuff out. It can’t always be everybody else’s stuff. So it sounds like you’ve tapped into that as well.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, %. I mean, look, again, we’re human beings. We need coaches, we need people to hear us and we need the chance to be seen and heard and really appreciated. Right. And that is the opportunity in this. It’s amazing when you share those personal, vulnerable stories, and this is probably the biggest thing. I know we’re not talking about leadership, but it’s the most profound lesson I learned in leadership. And it’s why I started my first book with vulnerability. It’s because it’s the most profound lesson I learned. I grew up in Montana where I was Top. Boys don’t cry. Well, it’s horrible advice, by the way, and it’s not true. But I was raised that way, I was conditioned that way, I thought that way. And then what I realized is that’s baloney and sharing your real feeling, that’s showing people that you have feelings too. You have these thoughts, which, by the way, of course that makes sense. But so often in leadership, we think we need to know everything. We need to sound perfect. You know what makes me really happy about what happened on the show is that Matt’s Mic went muted. And that’s perfect because life is not perfect. That’s not the way it works. Right?

 

Molly:

 

And we’re not going to edit it out because, yeah, we do this for a living and we still got it wrong. You know what I mean?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Imperfection, right? Brene Brown wrote a book on it. It’s so true because that’s real life. It’s not this perfect social media post that looks it’s just so filtered. That’s not real. This is real. And that’s what I love about this particular forum.

 

Molly:

 

Jam, you’re super rad. I like you a lot and I would love to get your. List of books, because I, too, like you, am a voracious reader, and I’ve read, like,  books in the last three, four years, some of them multiple times, like the  Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. But I would love to know that list, because I just, like, filling my head with somebody else’s thoughts other than my own, right? Especially successful people. It seems to be a good idea. So I’m glad to know there was a lot of push on, like, read more books, and then now there’s kickback on social media about like, you don’t have to read so many books, just read the same four ones. And I’m like, can we just let people do what they want? I have improved my life significantly by reading a whole lot of books about leadership. Like, they were all business development and then personal development. So John C. MacDowell and Brene Brown held up the tail end for personal development, and then the rest of it was how to Run a Good Business. And you know what? I didn’t read that many books as a competition. I read those books so that I can improve my business, and it works. So I’m on Team JM. Read more books.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

It is true. When I’ve met people throughout the industries, I say this what’s success? Well, obviously, that’s arbitrary. But people that I know that have hit those levels of success, quote, unquote, where they truly are financially free, they truly have these relationships that are fulfilling. There’s only one commonality, and it’s not that they’re tall or short or fat or skinny or black or white or anything. They all read. That is the only commonality I found. And it goes across all religions. It goes across all races, all man, woman, it doesn’t matter. I found that all successful people read. That’s it. And so it’s like, if we know that, why not? And again, there’s no judgment on it. Read as much as you can fit in a page a day. Fantastic. That’s great.

 

Molly:

 

And in any way that you can too, right? My brother is, like, a pretty accomplished writer. And if I say, like, oh, I read a book, he’s like, you listen to a book? And I’m like, don’t shame me, okay? Do it whatever way you want, man. I’ve had a bunch of spinal surgeries. I can’t sit around holding books, and I like to multitask. So audiobooks work great for me, right? So however you get that knowledge, it’s.

 

Matt:

 

Easy to just sit there and listen. Like, for me personally, too, to listen to sit there and try to read through and bang, bang, bang, it’s just like, much better just going through it that way.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Such a stigma about and I had the same by the way, I used to be that traditionalist, where it’s like, you have to smell the book and you have to hold it. Nonsense.

 

Molly:

 

Look, it is.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Just seek information. Seek to get better. Again, the whole philosophy is to get better, and listening to that book helps you get better. Great job. That’s awesome.

 

Molly:

 

If you take away one thing and listen I read a lot of books. Listen to a lot of books. Whatever. Grant cardone. If I hear that man say ten X one more time, I might run out of the room screaming. But you know what? I got a little bit of value from that book. There was a bunch of stuff. I was like, not for me, dude. But if I can get one gem out of a book, it was worth my time. And it’s interesting that there’s a couple of things, right? The three qualities, after reading all these books and ingesting all these podcasts and stuff, was leaders are readers number one. They all meditate, too, and everybody meditates in a different way, right? There’s no one thing. It’s like radalio meditates, right? Like, everybody meditates, and it just looks very different for everybody. And so however you want to do it, get it done. And then the third common trait that I noticed was PMA positive mental attitude. And they did this test with I can’t remember which book I read this in you probably read it, too, where they took all these Navy Seals and they were trying to figure out what made a Navy Seal, because they’re like, you said, tall, short, fat, skinny. There’s no like, oh, they all have this physical characteristic who makes it to be a Navy Seal. And they did all these tests and spent all this money, and it literally boiled down the positive mental attitude. The guys that were jumping out of the plane going, I don’t know, they didn’t make it. And the guys that were like, I’ll see you on the other side. Those are the guys that made it. And it was just literally believing that you could is what made people do it. It’s what made them capable. And I think that when you read a lot and you see examples of other people doing it, especially when they’re vulnerable and real about all their ugly parts, and they’re like, yeah, I’m really successful, but I was drunk for a little while, or I treated my wife poorly, but I overcame that. That makes it even more obtainable for people. And that’s what reading all those books taught me, is that anything that I want to create, I can if I’m willing to put the work in, right? You got to put the work the.

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Way you broke that down is brilliant because it simplifies things, right? Like reading, have a positive mental attitude, and spend some time with your thoughts. There’s no right or wrong way to meditate. It’s my favorite thing I do on a daily basis outside of the podcast. Yeah, I mean, I love to meditate. Why? Because I get to quiet the mind for a second, or maybe my mind’s going crazy, but guess what? I get that time for myself. And that reflection is just so good, man. Anyway, I could go on meditation, sorry, really? In the conversation.

 

Molly:

 

But anyway it’s all relative, right? It is. It’s a good reminder. I haven’t been meditating enough, so I think I’m going to meditate after this recording, as a matter of fact. Jim, this has been a really great conversation. I really appreciate you coming on and sharing your wisdom and experience with us. I look forward to seeing you again. Somehow, some way, for people who want to connect more with you, what is the best way for them to do that?

 

JM Ryerson:

 

Yeah, well, thanks, Matt and Molly, for having me. I really do appreciate it. Let’s go win. Let’s go win podcast. I told you how passionate I am about it. I would love for people to check that out and then let’s go. Win.  on any social media platform. So if you look up, let’s go. Win, I should be there. And if you reach out, I am one of those weird guys that will actually respond back to you and it will be me. I know it sounds crazy, but it is something that I committed to a long time ago, that no matter how big let’s go, win or JM or whatever, god, I went third person. I’m so sorry. It just happened. But anyway, no matter how big let’s go win. Got that. You stay true to who you are. And if somebody reaches out to me, I will reach back. It’s just the way I was raised. So, anyway, thank you guys.

 

Molly:

 

Thanks to your parents for that.

 

Matt:

 

Thank you so much.

 

Molly:

 

That’s right. Shout out to Mr. And Mrs. Ryerson. So, on that note, thank you so much for coming on the show today. This is a great interview. We really appreciate it. And for anybody tuning in, thanks. We hope we provided some value today. I don’t know how we couldn’t. That was a great conversation. If you found the content valuable, please consider sharing it on your platform of choice. And, of course, hit us up@heartcastmedia.com to see all the amazing stuff we’re doing and how we can help with you and your business this year. So until the next time, be excellent to one another and we’ll catch you on the flip side.

 

 

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